About PJ

PJ Adams is a psychotherapist and best selling author who splits her time between California and Europe. She enjoys learning French and writing about travel, self help, and other topics. Follow her on Twitter @PJAdams10Facebook, YouTube.

For more information on Meandering Trail Media or PJ Adams Books OR to schedule an interview or book signing, contact: Info@pjadamsbooks.com OR John Birkhead, PR Director, john.birkhead@pjadamsbooks.com,  +1 (760) 707-2577, Fax +1 949-258-8693.

See our France books trailer HERE

See the Intoxicating Greater Paris: Loire book trailer HERE. 

 

See the Intoxicating Southern France book trailer HERE 

See the Intoxicating Paris book trailer HERE     

         

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    PJ Adams

    PJ Adams is a psychotherapist and author in California.

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    Thursday
    Feb262015

    Intoxicating Southern France Features Provence This Week

    Picturesque Provence. A lovely part of Southern France filled with lovely vistas, lavendar aromas, garlic-infused dishes, and delightful Provençal people. This land, dubbed the "Provinces" by Julius Caesar, is shaped as much by its quirky people and colorful culture, as by its agricultural landscape, peasant cuisine, and dynamic history.

    Situated between the French Riviera and the vast Languedoc, Provence is famous for its rosé wines, charming hill towns like Gordes, Menerbes, and Bonnieux, street markets, and medieval and Roman ruins. Peter Mayle famously wrote about Provence in his many books starting with A Year in Provence. And when you visit these Alpilles-lined plains dotted with lavendar and sunflowers, you too will experience the splendid country lifestyle of rural Provence.

    Among its many pleasures are peasant cuisine flavored with the precious "black diamonds" (truffles), filled with fresh vegetables and Mediterranean olives, and accompanied by artisanal cheeses and local meats like wild boar, farm-raised poultry, and hearty country pâté. Meals are crowned by memorable Provençal sweets like white nougat and frosted callison cookies. And it's all washed down with sun-kissed rosés or world-famous red vintages from Châteauneuf du Pape. Stars Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie famously own a vineyard here called Miraval, by the way.   

    The people live a charming life in Provence. They see bullfights in Arles at the still-utilized Roman Amphitheater. They gaze at the legendary paintings of Van Gogh who painted here. They climb the limestone fortresses like Les-Baux-de-Provence, and sail along the Rhône or the Gardon River alongside the Pope's Palace in Avignon or under the grand Roman aqueduct at the Pont du Gard. And they visit their wonderful open-air markets, like the popular Wednesday market in Saint-Remy-de-Provence. Nostradamus, seer and favorite of the great Queen Catherine de' Medicia, as well as Vincent Van Gogh loved Saint-Remy.

    And there is much to see, do, and buy here, from the blue, purple, and yellow provençal linens and faience (pottery), to the keepsakes for your home or closet with lavendar motifs, Provençal images, or locales logos like Aix-en-Provence and Marseilles. Art abounds here as well, such as magnificent pieces by Paul Cezanne, as well as Van Gogh and others.

    Intoxicating Southern France takes readers on a grand tour of these Provence delights from its pages. And, if you decide to travel here, you may wish to engage the service of local guide companies like my American friend Christy Destremau who lives in France and offers a stellar group of private tours at Off the Beaten Path, LLC. Christy's tours are wonderfully managed venues where you will experience the pleasures of Provence in comfortable style.

    Ultimately a visit to Provence is a memory-making experience. The verdant lands, the magical white horses and feisty black bulls of the Camargue, the ruins at Glanum, and the ghosts of La Coste--all add to the wonderful mystique of beautiful Provence. And when you journey through Provence--whether in person or on the page--keep in mind the words of Frédéric Mistral: "When the Good Lord comes to doubt about the world, he remembers that he created Provence." Santé!

     

    Friday
    Jan162015

    Intoxicating Southern France Features the French Riviera This Week

    The French Riviera is one of the most beautful and famous locales on the planet. Its harbors are breathtaking like this one near Monaco. It has sparkling beaches, legendary hotels, and memorable cuisine like Salade Niçoise, that delicious fresh tuna, egg, and green bean salad. 

    Of course visitors come for a variety of reasons: the Cannes Film Festival in May where trend setters in film and fashion walk the red carpet and present their newest flicks; the legendary Monaco casino and the red-roofed palace on the Rock once home to a Princess named Grace; the famous haunts and fooderies of Nice; or the beach-chic lifestye of Saint-Tropez, Cap Ferret, and Antibes. 

    Though the Riviera has a wealthy vibe, it's accessible to ordinary visitors too who can enjoy this lovely Cote d'Azur without breaking the bank. The hotels like the Carlton in Cannes pictured offer affordable luxury and delightful opportunites to dine, brunch, or imbibe in style. Along with the glamorous nightlife, there are also simple pleasures like lolling on the beach, fishing, boating across the Mediterranean, strolling through the open air markets, and visiting the wonderful art galleries and museums. Pictured here, for example, is the Promenade along Nice. It makes for a fun wander or a perfect place to catch some rays. I once ran into someone from my own hometown strolling along the walkway, by the way!

    And of course there are fun locals to while away the hours with--on the beach, in the shops, on boats, in the fabulous eateries, or in everyday life not only along this famed coast, but up in the marvelous hill towns like Grasse and Éze that overlook the sea from their coastline perches.

    People are simply friendly here--and they love visitors who also love the sunny vibe in this fabulous locale. They are more than happy to show you the delights of their pretty coastline, as well as their stunning perfumeries like Fragonard, their popular markets like Cours Saleya, and their historical places like Sainte-Margeurite island just off Cannes where the Man in the Iron Mask was held.

    You'll find all of these French Riviera delights in Intoxicating Southern France, now available on Amazon and elsewhere. Come and join us in this fabullous Cote d'Azur that F. Scott Fitzgerald loved for its "sea as mysteriously colored as the agates and cornelians of childhood, green as green milk, blue as laundry water, wine dark."

     

    Sunday
    Jan112015

    Intoxicating Southern France: Uncorking the Magic in the French Riviera, Provence, Languedoc, Dordogne, and Bordeaux

    Happy 2015! We are happy to announce that pre-publication sales have begun for Intoxicating Southern France, scheduled for publication in February, 2015.

    It's our pleasure to bring you our coast-to-coast journey through the regions of Southern France. We’ll begin first on the French Riviera, home to sunny beaches, famous resorts, the dazzling Cannes Film Festival, and royal Monaco where gambling is king and starlet Grace Kelly became a princess.

    We’ll move on to lovely Provence and the lavender-scented hill towns of Gordes and Ménerbes where some of the most charming people in France call home. From there we’ll head to Van Gogh’s much-loved Arles, then on to medieval Les-Baux-de-Provence and the vast Camargue--home to feisty black bulls and wild white horses.

    Next, we’ll meander through the grand Languedoc where Roman might lives on in the Pont du Gard and Nimes’s Roman amphitheater, then on to lovely Albi where Toulouse-Lautrec was reared, and crag-perched Cordes-sur-Ciel, a medieval village in the sky.

    From there we’ll enter mythical Périgord where kings have prayed for miracles in Rocamadour and where the winding Dordogne River splits the land between warring 14th century Castelnaud and Beynac. We’ll descend into ancient caves to see art etched by primitive man. And we’ll float down the river on a barge and later dine on Sarlat’s famous foie gras and black Cahors wine.

    Finally, we’ll travel west to Saint-Émilion, ancient wine hamlet and purveyor of famous vintages. Then we’ll enter the noble grape kingdom that is Bordeaux. We’ll explore this vast wine domain that’s home to Lafite and Margaux—and some of the finest wines on the planet. We’ll tour some of the grands crus estates, learning from wine pros how the great Bordeaux vintages are made and taste the fruits of their labors.

    This book is about the history, food, culture, art, architecture, wine, lifestyle, and people who live in this fabled part of France. Above all, it’s a guide to the delights of Southern France for those who journey here--or dream of doing so one day. Come and join the fun at http://tinyurl.com/ISF2015PJAdams.

    Tuesday
    Dec232014

    Joyeux Noël: Some French Christmas Traditions

    My French friends whispered in my ear this Christmas season to remember the joys of Christmas spiked with some French panache. Among these are Galette des Rois (Kings Cake), which is a classic buttery puff pastry cake filled with delicious almond cream OR, in the south of France, a circular yeasted cake studded with colorful candied fruit. It's the tradition to bake a fève (bean) into the cake. Whoever gets the bean gets to be the roi (king) for the day and wear a gilded paper crown. (Bakeries often give crowns out with the galettes). I confess I'm picking up my own Galette des Rois tomorrow from my French chef pal, Pascal.

    Another French tradition is to put a shoe (or two) under the Christmas tree (or in front of the fire place) in hopes that Père Noël will fill them with gifts. (I pointed out to my husband that the only thing that would fit into one of my shoes would be a couple of boxes of fine jewlery...but then I'm reluctantly okay with that.) 

    Another French tradition I'm trying this year is to make Christmas Eve chili with duck confit (a recipe idea from my French friend JP). Yes, I understand from him the only way to make proper chili is with confit, which, in a strange American tradition, is available for a limited time each year from, of all places, Costco. Talk about an American/French collision!

    Finally, I'm putting out my darling Santons from Provence. These are the little dolls that populate the French crèche or manger where Baby Jesus and his parents are surrounded by locals like the baker, mayor, laundress, farmer, and occasionally even film stars like Yves Montand show up!

    At any rate, I'm looking forward to a delicous holiday season...and I hope you are too. Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, and Joyeux Noël to you and yours.

    Sunday
    Sep072014

    Intoxicating Paris Now at the American Library in Paris Book Award Exhibit

    Intoxicating Paris: Uncorking the Parisian Within is now on display at the American Library in Paris as part of the 2014 Book Award Exhibit through October 5, 2014. 

    The American Library in Paris provides a wonderful venue for expats, visitors, and anyone who loves English language books. Library members and visitors have access to more than 120,000 books, 500 periodicals (some of which date back to the mid-19th century), movies on DVD, and other audio-visual materials, plus reference and research resources in paper and electronic form.

    The American Library in Paris has attracted and celebrated writers for all of its ninety-three years. The Library was created in part as a memorial to a young American poet, Alan Seeger, who wrote the well-known poem “I have a rendezvous with death” not long before he died in action in France in 1916. One of the Library’s founding trustees was Edith Wharton. Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein, among many other writers of note, contributed reviews to the Library’s literary magazine, Ex Libris. Stephen Vincent Benet composed John Brown’s Body at the Library. The American Library in Paris was established in 1920 under the auspices of the American Library Association with a core collection of books and periodicals donated by American libraries to United States armed forces personnel serving their allies in World War I.

    Authors of every generation have worked and spoken at the Library: Ford Madox Ford, Archibald MacLeish, Colette, Henry Miller, André Gide, Anaïs Nin, James Baldwin, Irwin Shaw, James Jones, and Mary McCarthy, to name a few. The tradition continues with distinguished contemporary authors and other public figures who speak at the Library on more than sixty occasions a year. Recent speakers have included Joyce Carol Oates, Richard Ford, Reza Aslan, Mo Willems, Percival Everett, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Andrew Nagorski, Justice Anthony Kennedy, Alice Kaplan, Jean-Marc Barr, Ben Fountain, and Jerome Charyn.

     

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